Whirlpool Guest House
The Changing Face


The latest release from Stockton based independent record label Summerhouse is an irresistible slice of unashamed pop from Carl Green's latest project, reminiscent of early Teardrop Explodes or the shamefully neglected Chris Sievey and the Freshies (does anyone remember the wonderfully titled "I'm in Love with the Girl from the Manchester Virgin Megastore Checkout Desk"?). Like Sievey, Carl Green's work also encompasses film and video, the results of which some of you will have seen at Whirlpool Guest House's debut 'non-live' appearance at the Summerhouse package on 3rd March; but this is a fine single in its own right. Out now.

Cleveland Scene, 9-22 March 1987

An interesting offering from the talented four-piece outfit. The voices of Sally Davis and Carl Green provide an interesting contrast to a chirpy production.

Northern Echo, 12 March 1987

Two distinctly unfashionable sounds from Stockton-on-Tees' new label. First release Friends' 'It's Getting Louder' was a stiff slab of rock, but Whirlpool's acoustic pop is refreshingly edgy.

Len Brown
New Musical Express, 14 March 1987

Twee boy/girl duets can be tiresome. Ditto for bands with funny names like Whirlpool Guest House. Surprise, surprise, therefore, to spot feet tapping along to this appealing little number; it sort of sounds like a weedy Orange Juice, but the B-side proves to be a lot more manly.

Julian Henry
Underground, April 1987

Diese unscheinbare 7" ist ein unverzichtbares Kleinod. Ungeschliffener und doch warmherziger 6-Saiten-Popo mit Wechselgesang und umwerfendem Charme. Das es so was noch gibt! Mmmhh

Pop Noise, April/May 1987

A charming little number that reminds me of drifting along on my punt with cucumber sarnies, a bottle of champers and a young debs on the end of my, er my arm. Ah summer, what a wonderful life!

Northern Kickback, July 1987

This song has a mental disorder.

Cut, November 1987

Maybe an uncultivated Prefab Sprout. maybe not: sparse yet strong, gentle but determined ditty with a hypnotic bass and a floating female chanteuse. On the other side, the Whirlies meander into Cocteaus country with beguiling heavy-handedness and no little malevolence. Perplexing, attractive and certainly darned peculiar.

Jump Away, December 1987